After a bust by U.S. and British intelligence, A. Q. Khan confessed to selling nuclear secrets last February. Once a hero in his native Pakistan, he now lives under house arrest

De koopwaar

Merchandise
Khan sold equipment similar to these centrifuges turned over by Libya to the U.S. last March. The centrifuges are designed to refine uranium, which can be used as fuel—or to make nuclear bombs

Osama bin Laden
Al Qaeda has not been tied to Khan, but is actively seeking the bomb

 

Muammar Gaddhaffi
Gaddafi spent millions on Khan's equipment and bomb designs

Kim Jong Il
North Korea was another Khan centrifuge customer

 

Ayatollah Ali Khameini
Iran's mullahs bought centrifuges for their nuclear programs

Johan Meyer
Owner of South African engineering company Tradefin, where a police raid discovered a massive steel-processing system destined for Libya

 

Buhary Sayed Abu Tahir
Khan protégé, he coordinated the network from Dubai. Arrested in 2003, Tahir has divulged secrets of the network's operations

Gerhard Wisser
An associate of Meyer's and managing director of Krisch Engineering, he is accused of being a conduit to the Khan network

 

Allies
At a White House meeting in December, Bush pressed Pakistan's leader to open Khan up to questioning. Musharraf said the CIA could only submit written queries

Centerboek
ISBN 90-5087-027-9

meer artikelen

back home